Select Page

Brenda Inskeep

  • Brenda Inskeep posted a new activity comment 1 year, 9 months ago

    Dear Jennifer, This is a tough topic and I understand how deflated people feel. First of all sorry that this happened. It is such a bummer. Where were the kids doing this cyberbullying. It has been happening on WhatsApp at our school, even in the 4th grade. I honestly cannot believe it, but we have to keep trying to teach what we teach and…[Read more]

  • Brenda Inskeep posted a new activity comment 1 year, 9 months ago

    Matt, thank you for sharing your thinking. It sounds like you are a technology integrator at your school or in your heart. I too often think of all of these things. Our netiquette is taught quickly at the beginning of the year and then again on Safer Internet Day in February. Our school has me for only 20% of the time as a technology integrator…[Read more]

  • For this particular project, I choose Option One and continue to use an ongoing review our Middle School Responsible Use Policy with any assistance I could muster. I started editing the Responsible Use Policy with […]

  • As educators, we can make sure that our students understand that making a positive image is critical to who they are online. I love the story of what Martha did with “Never Seconds” and also helping Mary Mea […]

    • Hi Brenda,
      I agree, kids don’t understand the power they have in making a difference! First and foremost, we have to help our students care about the world outside and within the classroom. With care, then teachers, including myself (because I know I’m not doing of this), can begin to show students how to make a difference through technology. We should show that technology is not just a source of entertainment, but it can become a powerful tool for children to share their voices- even a kindergarten voice. Hopefully, if we start early, by middle school students will have causes they care about and understand that there is a space for everybody’s voice and an opportunity for everyone to make a difference.
      Nicky

    • Good afternoon Brenda

      I was excited to read your blog post about Digital Empowerment. All too often students and people in general are told what they are not allowed to do. Empowering students is the key to engagement and greater motivation, and I believe ultimately greater learning. I was happy to see your tedx link. I have been a fan of TED for a number years and I am always amazed to see the the genius of the human mind. Often I will go to TED for a 15 minute burst of inspiration instead of some dreary politicised news bulletin.
      Also thanks for sharing the digital citizens wiki link. I was wondering if you had looked at nearpod. This is a superb platform for teacher made lesson on all manner of topic. There is a section of free material but recently my school paid for some of the digital citizenship resources available. I highly recommend taking a look.
      It was interesting to read your comment that “Kids are only empowered when doing a task where they don’t think that they are being directed by the teacher. ” My school is relatively new and tech integration is a work in progress. At the moment Minecraft is a popular tool that can be integrated into so many different lessons in wonderful and creative ways. But at the moment my school isn’t willing to go down that road………yet. However I could see the benefit of incorporating it into a math unit about perimeter and UOI about how physical geography can have an impact on human settlement. The students thought they were playing. I was pretending I didn’t know how to do anything in the game. They had to help me and explain everything. Now perimeter is done and dusted and they know why/how settlements are effected by physical geography. Just hope the principle doesn’t find out. 😉

    • How do we empower students? We don’t we provide them the opportunities for them to be empowered. I think that the use of the internet can be empowering but not with the myriad of DO NOT rules that tend to be part of the Acceptable Use Policies that are part of most schools. I think we need to rework them to something that is about what we want them to be as a digital citizen and a citizen of the world.

  • Who should be taught about digital citizenship and the etiquette of the Internet and web? Everyone needs to be taught and learn how to act responsibly in the public arena, but something happens to people once […]

    • Hi Brenda,

      Thanks for your blog post and I am interested in adding some thoughts on the concept of the “like” button. I agree completely with you that the power of this button has impacted the way in which people (both adults and kids) share ideas and post online. For kids, the “like” button seems to be proof of attention in a very tangible way. This relates back to the idea of whose responsibility it is to teach digital citizenship and support students in being a positive presence in digital forums. I certainly feel that first and foremost the responsibility for this is on parents, communities, and schools, but perhaps we should be writing to organizations like Facebook or other social media companies to ask them to diversify their options for the ‘like’ button to encourage more positive types of reactions to posts. I’ve noticed recently that something like this has already started to happen on Facebook, but I haven’t been able to determine whether this contributes to more bullying, or helps to diversify the ways in which readers might be able to respond to a post.

      Thanks for your blogpost.

      Chris

  • Brenda Inskeep posted a new activity comment 1 year, 9 months ago

    Chris,
    I can tell that you must be a very conscientious teacher and also person as you mention the importance of transparency and honesty. Thank you for mentioning so many other avenues that we use privacy in protecting ourselves, environments, and especially with the government. See you at work soon!
    Brenda

  • As educators, it is our duty to teach proper usage of online sources and giving credit where credit is due. As a middle school humanities teacher, I do teach copyright and plagiarism. I do not have a problem […]

  • Brenda Inskeep posted a new activity comment 1 year, 10 months ago

    Dear Brendon, thank you for added the comment about users on computers! I also have experienced this with my children using one another’s profiles. This can be a bad situation. Luckily, we have been talking about these implications more and more at home. In my school, we have the students create their own Google sign in and sign into the computer.…[Read more]

    • Hi Brenda,

      Great to see that you are getting your students to learn nice and early to log in and log out. Forgetting to log out can haunt them.
      Thanks for reading the post.

      Brendon

  • I think one of my biggest concerns about privacy online is how most kids forget to think about it unless they are taught to pay attention. Even if you do teach it, doesn’t mean that the kids will heed the w […]

  • Brenda Inskeep posted a new activity comment 1 year, 10 months ago

    Dear Amber, It’s interesting to see similarities in our experiences online although I missed the whole MySpace thing. I think I tried it and then didn’t see the importance at that time in my life. I really started Facebook in 2008 once I moved to Malaysia. It was fun to be in touch with family and friends. I had to ask that some photos be taken…[Read more]

  • Brenda Inskeep posted a new activity comment 1 year, 10 months ago

    Thank you Byron for the feedback. It was a GREAT project. Kids really excelled in the learning.

  • Brenda Inskeep posted a new activity comment 1 year, 10 months ago

    I’m hopeful to do the exercise with my students. Thank you for the post!

  • Brenda Inskeep posted a new activity comment 1 year, 10 months ago

    Dear Matthew, Thank you for the feedback. I taught this last year in middle school with 6-8th-grade students. I also do tech integration, and teach humanities. Unfortunately, not all kids will take this course as it was an elective. Sadly, it died due to lack of interest and should have been taken by all students, or at least similar curriculum…[Read more]

  • As a teacher in the international scene, one needs a professional online presence or a strong positive digital footprint. Personally, I feel lucky to all of the have a decent presence now, but I am not sure that […]

    • Hello, Brenda.

      What a fantastic video. They are great questions. I think no matter what are role is with technology, whatever generation we represent, whatever professions we have, or wish to have, these questions are paramount. How do we want to be remembered?

      The idea of memory is so vastly different now than it was before. When entire conversations are written, there is less often an opportunity to mis-remember something. Instead, we just recall the text / email / Facebook post. Good or bad, it just is.

      Do I want to be remembered as the obnoxious 17 year old who fought frequently with my mother? Would I have published these details to a public forum then? Now, as a thirty-six year old, I maintain a fairly high level of privacy. I’m not a cryptic status updater. I don’t generally post photos of my lunch. I only occasionally repost something I find interesting, or conversation worthy. If social media were a part of my upbringing, how different, I wonder, would my sentence be?

      Thanks for sharing the video.

      -Kristen

    • Hi Brenda,

      Thanks for sharing your experience with the Trillion Dollar Footprint… I’d read about it last summer and considered using it myself. I’ve used a lot of Common Sense materials in my last 1.5 years or so as a tech coach for an international school, and they’re my go-to for anything digital citizenship. This year we explored a lot of new technology within our normal curriculum (our tech program is integrated) but I felt that we needed more space for these kind of discussions and that it’s difficult to convince others to make time in their schedule for them. I think it would work best with some of my older elementary students, what age group was your Digital Daily course targeted at? How did you make it more accessible for EAL learners? Is Digital Daily a pull-out course for certain students or one that everyone will eventually take?

      Thanks for putting up with all my questions, and for posting something that inspired them!
      -M

      • Dear Matthew, Thank you for the feedback. I taught this last year in middle school with 6-8th-grade students. I also do tech integration, and teach humanities. Unfortunately, not all kids will take this course as it was an elective. Sadly, it died due to lack of interest and should have been taken by all students, or at least similar curriculum should be addressed. Currently, we are a one to one laptop school and there is no “tech” teaching per se, but only as on a need to learn/know basis. At the beginning of the year, we do stations for the middle schoolers and an out of the box experience for them to set up their computers, profiles, and blogs. When they start their blogs, the kids watch a very short video about digital citizenship and online presence, as well as, take a quiz about Responsible Use policy. Then they are asked to do a reflection regarding what they learned. It isn’t a terrible system, but it has flaws. Since there is not a grade attached to the blog post, kids tend to forget about doing it. If you want more information – let me know. 🙂

  • Brenda Inskeep posted a new activity comment 1 year, 11 months ago

    Dear Marcello – thank you for swimming through that post. I appreciate your taking it seriously and recognizing my stream of consciousness as I wrote. I have needed to update my credentials for awhile in technology and like the opportunity to have an excuse to read and feed my brain a bit. I enjoy that. It does become overwhelming at times to…[Read more]

  • As students have completed many novels about the culture and historical events of China as well as reading informational text books and watching documentaries about China, they have curiosities about a deeper […]

    • Brenda,

      Wow, I learned a ton reading & watching your plans. You have done an excellent job of linking to a wide variety of tools students can use to organize their presentation. I learned about NoodleTools, Pecha Kucha presentations, and I traveled through some Google Docs and listened about how best to select a research question.

      Very impressive. Thanks for sharing all these great ideas.

      Byron

  • Brenda Inskeep posted a new activity comment 1 year, 11 months ago

    Twitter – No, I am not using Twitter. I’ve tried this three times and I don’t feel that twitter fits into my life yet. I have tried to use it in three countries at three different jobs and was encouraged at three different conferences. It just doesn’t seem to be my style. I’m a busy teacher, technology integrator, mother of two, and living in a co…[Read more]

    • Ha! 6$!! I hear you Brenda. It’s important to find something that fits your style and behaviors. I myself have struggled with G+… sometimes I get really into it and other times I barely visit. To each their own…

  • Brenda Inskeep posted a new activity comment 1 year, 11 months ago

    Dear Cheryl, I selected your piece as it was the most recent on the blogroll from our Cohort6 group. I don’t think that you are far off the mark when it comes to how you are feeling and your overwhelming position plus doing this class. I think that your post sounds a little like mine from this week. I did read your entire post last night and was…[Read more]

    • Brenda,
      Thanks for reading the dark side of my experience. I am happy to say that I have a much better feeling about things now. I am far from being settled and have a routine but I am working with what I can do when I can do it.
      Hope things are going ok for you.
      Cheryl

  • It amazes me each week how I can get lost in the task of reading and looking for information about how the learning landscape has changed over the course of time with technology. There is so much to learn and […]

    • Hi Brenda,

      I love your almost stream of consciousness writing. It sounds like you have a boatload of things that you are figuring out, and you are knocking them down furiously! I can pick a couple of the issues that you brought up and share my thoughts on them, and perhaps that can be helpful.
      Your last paragraph was interesting to me, because I ask that question to myself all of the time. Like you say, start with the why…
      What I have come to believe is that we need to decide, each of us, each school we work at, we all need to think about what and how we want our students to learn. Once that is clear (it’s a mission statement maybe, or a personal philosophy, etc) then we can begin to tailor things accordingly. This idea is so important with regard to technology, right? I so often see a mismatch between the expectations of technology what is being done in the classroom. Learning will not transform until the pedagogy becomes transformational.
      I love your question about devices. Do we need all these devices? I would love to see that thrown out to a Twitter chat. What would suffer? Would some aspects of learning improve? It goes back to what and how you are teaching, but it is a fascinating question.

    • Dear Marcello – thank you for swimming through that post. I appreciate your taking it seriously and recognizing my stream of consciousness as I wrote. I have needed to update my credentials for awhile in technology and like the opportunity to have an excuse to read and feed my brain a bit. I enjoy that. It does become overwhelming at times to balance work, kids, and myself while taking the course, but I do appreciate the process and always remembering the why.

  • Load More