Select Page

Greg Jardin

  • To be honest, this was the assignment I was most worried about in Course 5…that is until I began making my iMovie for the final project and realized how much work that was going to be!  When I think of a […]

  • My Final Video
    My grade seven classes have finished their free verse poetry unit, capping the experience off by creating digital poems.  This was inspired by the digital storytelling materials studied in Co […]

  • Where Did the Time Go?
    Students have completed the bulk of the poetry unit leading up to the final Digital Poetry assignment.  They have learned how to:

    use white space, line breaks, fonts, and stanzas […]

  • Rationale for Using Free Verse Poems
    For my final project, students in my grade seven classes will create digital stories for the free verse poems that they create.  This project arose from a desire to d […]

  • My Course 5 Project
    In thinking about my Course 5 Project (for next school year), I am pretty sure that I will do the Poetry Unit that I wrote about.  I am sure I will continue to tweak it, and I need to further […]

  • In my previous post, I discussed the influence of technology on the future of education, but this has led me to contemplate how technology is influencing the present.  There are irrefutable positives about us […]

    • Hello Greg

      I loved this post and I have to say I agree on the music/TV being more distracting than focusing. I think deep down the people who say it help (I am included in those people) really know it doesn’t help us to concentrate, but actually it is just something we LIKE to have. It’s almost as if the distraction itself helps us get through the task of studying. I think tech breaks are a great idea, but I really loved the Brain break idea and will definitely use this in my classroom. The balance info-graphic is also a great one that I will have on my noticeboard to reference when planning.

      This is just an idea but you said that when your students are researching they often start watching Youtube or using something else. I wondered if you could combine research with mocing around the classroom and device work. Maybe gamification of the research in some way shape or form. The kids will see others getting to the next level and want to beat each other, thus no time for Youtube (of course there’s always one who says the game is rubbish and won’t engage but then you can monitor them much more easily). Even breakout EDU games (http://www.breakoutedu.com/) could be a great way to engage all students in research using a mixture of movement around the classroom and device to keep the focus for longer, thus eliminating the need for breaks.

      Of course this is just cloud thinking but just thought I would throw it our there!

  • Greg Jardin posted a new activity comment 2 years, 5 months ago

    Blair,

    Thanks for posting this infographic about technology integration—it is a great, concise summary of the main goals of integration, and I like how it gives the criteria for the “innovator” and the “laggard.” For myself, however, I don’t agree that finding technology integration “time-consuming,” and “intimidating” qualifies that pers…[Read more]

  • When contemplating the future of education, images of science fiction cartoons, movies, and books flood my mind–robot teachers, being plugged into virtual reality centres at home, creating new life f […]

    • Hi Greg,
      Your post summarized all the topics for this week. I struggled with all the ready and enjoyed your summarized version Thank you!!. I totally agree with you that Technology will continue to influence and shape education significantly. One way I really liked and
      badges. Like you I had’t heard about badges in education before. But I think it Badges have lots of potential in education.Check out class badges site it is free tool to create digital badges for your students.

  • This week I focused my readings on flipping the classroom.  This is something I have heard a lot about, yet I hadn’t done much research into flipped classrooms other than reading an occasional article.  Als […]

    • Hey Greg,
      I also looked into flipped classrooms at the start of my research, but just didn’t feel completely connected to theory. I thought it looked more appropriate for upper grades where students are used to researching and going through learning materials on their own. In that case, they could make better use of the time to collaborate at the higher level. I, however, teach kindergarten and we basically do every step together. But, there are concepts that I liked in the flipped model – like the focus on collaboration higher-level work, and also the cycle of learning (experimental engagement, concept exploration, meaning making, and demonstration and application). So, I’ll take what I can use in a kindergarten classroom; but, at this time, I must also agree to pass on flipped classrooms for now.
      Nicky

  • This week I was reading a lot about innovative learning strategies, or inquiry learning.  It made me think of Sir Ken Robinson’s video, “Changing Education Paradigms.”  The video is critical of today’s outdated e […]

  • This year, our school went to a 1:1 MacBook program in the MS after first introducing it at the elementary level.  To encourage teachers to fully integrate technology, the school brought in Kim Coffino to do a […]

  • Since completing the poetry unit with grade 7, which I wrote about for my Course 1 Final Project, I wondered if I could still do more with the visual component of the project.  I also wanted students to reach an […]

  • Greg Jardin posted a new activity comment 2 years, 6 months ago

    I was intrigued by the idea you addressed that we are returning to a “caveman communication” (http://bit.ly/1E1kKrH). Recently, I was teaching my grade eights persuasive writing, and I asked them to consider the kind of conversation they would have if they were trying to convince a parent to let them do something. Then I asked them to env…[Read more]

    • Hi Greg,
      Many thanks for your comments.
      What a fantastic idea using text messages to allow the children in your class to show their learning. I really think it is using the children’s intrests and knowledge to show what they know. It is interesting that children are more motivated to work in such a way.
      I have recently started to use emojis (…[Read more]

  • Infographics to use with the Grade 6 Advertisement Posters

    I looked at many infographics this week and found one in particular that I would definitely use in the future.  This was one that would have helped […]

    • Nice resources. I’ll pass them on to my colleagues. 1-page takeaways and/or summaries are just about the right amount for people to process on any given topic…

  • When researching digital storytelling this week, there was an overwhelming amount of information online.  Where do I start?  How much time should I spend looking at the resources?  Whatever the correct an […]

  • I have to admit that I have only ever created one PowerPoint, and it was with Tim Sheu for the final Course 2 Project.  In thinking about this week’s assignment, I looked back on our PowerPoint and recognized th […]

  • Greg Jardin posted a new activity comment 2 years, 7 months ago

    Thanks, Matt. Yes, using visual images is great for ELL students. I hadn’t thought about it before, but when I used traditional writing prompts, my ELL students often asked about the meanings of certain words, and some used their translators…which oftentimes furthered the confusion, depending on the accuracy of the translation! Since I’ve…[Read more]

  • Greg Jardin posted a new activity comment 2 years, 7 months ago

    Thanks, Tim. Storytelling is also a great practice. Even just having students retell their own writing often improves its quality. When I conference with students, I always begin by asking them to tell me what they are writing about (to retell their writing). When students go through that process, they often add in clarifying details,…[Read more]

  • The Past and the Present

    One thing I’ve felt was lacking in my writing class last year was the use of visuals. Oh, of course my classroom has lots of posters about figurative language, etc., along with a […]

    • Hi Greg, I enjoyed reading about your successful experience with using visual prompts in your English class. I appreciate how you took pictures of a couple of pages of the students’ journal entries. I think I’ll also try using visual prompts next time. This past week I used a storytelling activity to get my students warmed up and brainstorming for a writing task. It also worked very well. I think the simple act of verbally articulating an event really helped them put their thoughts into words and produce more vivid details.

      • Thanks, Tim. Storytelling is also a great practice. Even just having students retell their own writing often improves its quality. When I conference with students, I always begin by asking them to tell me what they are writing about (to retell their writing). When students go through that process, they often add in clarifying details, description, etc. that they keep in mind when they later resume their writing. Then when we look at specific parts of their writing, students often realize that what they said and what they wrote sometimes don’t match up, and that gives them a starting point for revisions. Either way, verbally articulating their ideas, as you indicated, is a great way of getting students to think more about their writing.

    • Love your idea about using visual prompts for writing – will share that with my faculty next week! Our student body is 100% ELL so this is a great way to differentiate for them – and, by selecting images relevant to their home culture, acknowledge their background as well.

      • Thanks, Matt. Yes, using visual images is great for ELL students. I hadn’t thought about it before, but when I used traditional writing prompts, my ELL students often asked about the meanings of certain words, and some used their translators…which oftentimes furthered the confusion, depending on the accuracy of the translation! Since I’ve gone to visual writing prompts, I don’t get any questions; students get right into the writing, so there isn’t any wasted time. Using culturally relevant images is a great way of including all students. Perhaps you could get students to bring in their own photos that depict something of their cultures as well.

    • Greg, you have inspired me with the idea of using images to help prompt writing. I have seen many times where teachers give students a writing prompt and have them begin writing. For those students who may not have as much strength in imagining scenes or characters in their mind’s eye, having an image available would be greatly helpful. I intend to share many of the ideas you have listed here with our staff. Thank you very much for sharing your successes!

  • DRAGON’S DEN PROJECT

    This week’s readings on visual literacy fit perfectly with what I am doing with my grade six students right now.  I am collaborating with another teacher, Abena Bailey, on an ad […]

    • Greg, this definitely struck a chord. Glad this course and topics are timely with Dragon’s Apprentice. I really like your summation, “[a]fter putting many hours into reading articles, forming opinions about them, and articulating your ideas, it only makes sense to utilize what we know about how people read online to make sure our own posts get more than just a cursory scanning.” Too right! How we present our information is key which is also what you are teaching the grade six. From a practical sense start with your blog theme and consider what color, header you’d like to include. Consider using your ability with words to go beyond your cleverly written blog post titles (i.e. When CRAP is a Good Thing) and include your blog site title.

  • Load More