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Glenda Frank

  • As a mathematics teacher, I find it very interesting that the critical piece in the development of any unit I plan is my choice of title. From The Changing Face of Mathematics, to With Both Magnitude and […]

  • Digital Citizenship has been front and centre in my thinking throughout Course 2 so I was very happy to join in with Layla Block and Chris Calvert to create a unit on digital citizenship. Layla teaches high […]

  • Glenda Frank posted a new activity comment 1 year, 9 months ago

    Hi Donna,

    Thanks for reading and commenting on this post. I agree with you that not many people think of math as the ultimate remix, but as you said the reality of our world is that we build on the ideas of others in all areas. And I agree there is great value in teaching students digital citizenship in combination with similar lessons we…[Read more]

  • Glenda Frank posted a new activity comment 1 year, 9 months ago

    Thanks for reading and commenting on this post. I agree with you that there is great value in sharing the stories of where ideas come from with our students, and I am glad to hear that you are busy busting “Eureka moment” myths in your science class.

    I think it’s interesting that we talk about remixes in music, literature, art and film all t…[Read more]

  • Glenda Frank posted a new activity comment 1 year, 9 months ago

    Hi Chris,

    Thanks for reading and commenting on this post. I had forgotten the famous Newton quote about “standing on the shoulders of giants,” and your reminder made me think of a parallel between Newton and Steve Jobs. In the video Everything is a Remix, Kirby Ferguson tells the story of how Steve Jobs was okay with “borrowing” ideas from ot…[Read more]

  • Glenda Frank posted a new activity comment 1 year, 9 months ago

    Hi Paul,

    Thanks for reading and commenting on this post. I agree with you when you say we need to stop with the fear mongering “this will be FOREVER” and move to the promotion of creating positive digital footprints. Since starting COETAIL I have become much more knowledgeable about the need to get students to create positive digital foo…[Read more]

  • Glenda Frank posted a new activity comment 1 year, 9 months ago

    Hi Jen,

    Thanks so much for reading and commenting on this post. I find it rather funny that even though we live beside each other and work at the same school, we never see each other except through COETAIL ☺

    I find it very interesting that even though we work with very different students, we have a commonality in feeling that many of our s…[Read more]

  • “Whose job is it to teach digital citizenship skills?” “When and where should we be having these conversations with students?” I think that the answer to these two questions is the same as the answer to the […]

    • Hi Paul,

      Thanks for reading and commenting on this post. I agree with you when you say we need to stop with the fear mongering “this will be FOREVER” and move to the promotion of creating positive digital footprints. Since starting COETAIL I have become much more knowledgeable about the need to get students to create positive digital footprints and I have recently gotten my grade 10 math students to start blogging. So far so good! The article that you linked will be very useful in giving me ideas about other things my students might do.

      Thanks again for your comments. And yes, so far COETAIL has been a blast. Thanks for your words of encouragement.

      Glenda

    • Glenda,

      Digital citizenship is a critical issue facing 21st century education. Industrial era teaching helped students to cope with a world where social pleasantries, respect, and politeness were the main citizenship skills taught. Today’s students leave the education system and enter a world where a new set of digital literacy skills are not just needed, but required – sometimes more so than an academic credential.

      You refer to Marc Prensky’s terms of digital immigrants and digital natives. Digital natives have grown up with technology at their finger tips – they don’t know life without it. I agree that digital immigrants can bring a different perspective and introduce new and different ways of thinking or looking at something. However, we also need to respect the new digital culture that is being embedded all around us. This culture includes the technology, resources, and language associated with a new era of knowledge and skills needed to be successful. Including this sense of digital culture in our classrooms is important, but I also agree with you when you discuss the need for students to learn how to become digital citizens – learn how to navigate within this digital culture effectively, respectfully, and with purposefully.

      In the many rabbit holes that I go down, I found an article that discusses the idea of a “digital divide,” but not in terms of students who have technology and students who don’t (although this is a major issue). It was more referring to a divide in terms of students who are digitally literate (know how to use technology effectively) and those who are not digitally literate. I found this to be significant – when we think of all of your students and we label them as “digital natives” we may be making some assumptions about them that will affect their learning process. Just because an individual can tweet, post a pic on IG, snapchat, and write a personal blog…doesn’t mean they know how to search for information properly, vet a website, evaluate bias and credibility, etc… These are the digital citizenship skills we need to be instilling – how to critically think about the information they are viewing when they are online…to ask questions…to search for answers.

      I know you remember the educational theory known as connectivism from course 1? Connectivsm basically moves traditional learning theories into the digital age by including technology not just as tools for learning, but as part of the learning process. It also involves the idea of engaging students with outside sources of knowledge building – moving away from the 19th century model of teacher/lecture – and having students discover, communicate, and connect.

      Hmmmm … something to ponder with our committee work!

  • Glenda Frank posted a new activity comment 1 year, 9 months ago

    Dear Jon,

    Fear Off. Power On. Great title. Great post. Great project. A big take away for me during this second course has been about doing a better job at putting a positive spin on all things digital, and stopping with all the fear-mongering and negativity. I love that fact that you, Matt, Shane and Chelsea made a really student and parent…[Read more]

  • Glenda Frank posted a new activity comment 1 year, 9 months ago

    Hello Chris,

    My name is Glenda Frank and I am a high school math teacher at the American Community School in Abu Dhabi. I am part of the Coetail Online Cohort6 group and we are just in the process of finishing up Course 2. I read your post about flipped classrooms in mathematics with great interest.

    I have always been a great skeptic when…[Read more]

    • Hello Glenda,

      First, great reflections and questions. I think that you have mentioned some very key components to effectively teaching mathematics: investigations, observations, discussions, and collaboration. I do try to make these happen on a daily basis in my classroom. Part of my decision to flip or blend the learning experiences for my…[Read more]

    • Hi Glenda,

      By the way, if you ever do flip your math classroom or parts of it, please don’t hesitate to contact me with any questions you may have. I am at hoffmanc@tas.tw. I would be glad to help.

  • Glenda Frank posted a new activity comment 1 year, 9 months ago

    Hi Jon,

    Funnily enough it was the guilty look of the student that caused him to be caught – and he was the one who initiated the change of the name of his URL to blaisepascalfanboy. Yes I agree with you wholeheartedly – for him it was about the laughs he gets from his buddies and not digital footprints. I also agree with you that in some way…[Read more]

  • Glenda Frank posted a new activity comment 1 year, 9 months ago

    Dear Chris,

    I really enjoyed reading this post and I especially liked the format of you writing a letter to your students. As a higher level math teacher, I don’t have the opportunity to get students to do very many research-based projects (other than their internal assessment), but this COETAIL course has certainly given me a lot to reflect o…[Read more]

  • As I reflect on creativity, copyright, plagiarism and other concepts related to the remix culture in the area of mathematics, I can’t help but think about one of the most famous mathematical controversies of a […]

    • Great post. I have not thought of Math as the ultimate remix. As I read through your arguments, it really is just building on idea after idea. The reality of the world we live in, is that we need to teach students to respect intellectual property and maybe pointing out where that has not been always the case in the past is a way to start.

      • Hi Donna,

        Thanks for reading and commenting on this post. I agree with you that not many people think of math as the ultimate remix, but as you said the reality of our world is that we build on the ideas of others in all areas. And I agree there is great value in teaching students digital citizenship in combination with similar lessons we have learned from the past.

        Thanks again for your comments.

        Glenda

    • Math as a remix, of course it is.
      I think this is the case in almost all fields. As you suggest perhaps we should spend more time going through that historical development of ideas in order to show them that these ideas have developed over time and build on one another.
      While you use Newton and Leibniz I use Einstein and his development of relativity and the photoelectric effect as an opportunity for discussing where these ideas actually came from. Einstein’s strength was making connections between other physicists work and drawing conclusions from these connections. Students are of course quite upset when you tell them that perhaps the most famous physicist ever didn’t even do his own experiments/research. I do think these types of discussion help students to see the ‘Eureka moment’ for what it is, a myth. Unfortunately, hard work building over decades does not make for a good textbook story and so it is not what is propagated.
      Thanks for sharing.
      E

      • Thanks for reading and commenting on this post. I agree with you that there is great value in sharing the stories of where ideas come from with our students, and I am glad to hear that you are busy busting “Eureka moment” myths in your science class.

        I think it’s interesting that we talk about remixes in music, literature, art and film all the time, but we talk very little about the role of remixing in scientific and mathematical developments. Perhaps it is because these stories were rarely public knowledge in the past. But I think this is starting to change. For example, here is a podcast I recently listened to called, “The Mathematicians Who Helped Einstein.” It’s a great laymen-friendly story about the interconnectedness of mathematical and scientific discoveries.

        Thanks again for your comment,

        Glenda

    • In light of this story, it’s ironic that Newton at another time credited his achievements to “standing on the shoulders of giants.” Still, seeing a three-hundred-years-old copyright dispute is strangely refreshing, as it reminds us these issues are neither unique to contemporary society nor a result of any particular technologies.
      Calculus controversies may demystify towering figures like Newton, but I like to think it also shows their humanity. Students only get half the story if they learn about great discoveries without understanding the flawed people behind them. If students can identify with the geniuses of the past, maybe they’ll see themselves as capable of big things as well.
      Also, I commend you on choosing this example rather than the Smithsonian article’s #1 intellectual property dispute, Mike Tyson’s tattoo artist.

    • Hi Chris,

      Thanks for reading and commenting on this post. I had forgotten the famous Newton quote about “standing on the shoulders of giants,” and your reminder made me think of a parallel between Newton and Steve Jobs. In the video Everything is a Remix, Kirby Ferguson tells the story of how Steve Jobs was okay with “borrowing” ideas from others, but once others started “borrowing” ideas from him, his story changed – very much like Newton.

      I agree with you when you say that students only get half the story when they learn about great discoveries without learning about the “flawed” people behind them, and in math I’m not sure students even get half the story as math lessons often don’t go beyond naming the person who created this or that. I agree with you that students really need these background stories to fight the myth of “instant genius” and to see themselves as capable, young adults.

      Thanks again for your comments,

      Glenda

  • Of all the articles I have read this past month, one of the ones that struck me the most was Digitally Speaking / Positive Digital Footprints by William M. Ferriter. In the article, Ferriter quotes technology […]

    • Hi Jen,

      Thanks so much for reading and commenting on this post. I find it rather funny that even though we live beside each other and work at the same school, we never see each other except through COETAIL ☺

      I find it very interesting that even though we work with very different students, we have a commonality in feeling that many of our students leave middle or high school with their talents hardly recognized. And, like you, I now see the answer as very obvious – get students to start sharing the wonderful things that they are doing. And yes, to answer one of your questions, since COETAIL Course 2 I have gotten my grade 10 math students to start blogging and yes their blogs are public. So far they have made three entries – two reflective pieces on how they have approached learning a concept they have struggled with in our probability unit, and one post of their choice requiring them to share and comment on an interesting probability-related resource they have found or share something that they have done to uniquely engage with material in the unit. The posts have been awesome, and this is definitely something I will continue with next year. Interestingly enough, I am also currently designing a unit called “Digital Citizenship through a Mathematical Lens” that I am hoping to teach to my Higher Level Math students next fall, because I totally agree with you when you say that digital citizenship lessons are more powerful if they are built into the content areas. Valdir’s ideas will be of great assistance to me as I continue to implement digital citizenship into my math class, as will the ideas in the article that you included in your comments. Thanks for sharing.

      Great talking to you ☺

      Thanks again for your comments.

      Glenda

  • Glenda Frank posted a new activity comment 1 year, 9 months ago

    Hello Andrew,

    I am slow to get started in Course 2 and I have been busy reading and reflecting about digital footprints so I was happy to see that you are only recently posting about this concept as well. I really enjoyed your post – the title of the blog, the images you chose to go along with the blog and the analogies that you make. I love t…[Read more]

    • Thank you for your comment Glenda. The digital footprint takes on a whole new meaning once it come from out of our classes and into our houses. Your children may be in upper primary and middle school, but I find myself faced with similar challenges when my three daughters under 7 want to have some screen time. The coaching is just as important at…[Read more]

  • This past week in my Grade 10 Extended Math class our tech integrator came into my classroom to get students started with the creation of their new Math Blogs. As he talked to students about setting up their […]

    • Hi Glenda,

      Another flowing and rich blog post!!!

      When I read your story of “Blaise420Pascal”, I had to chuckle!!! I’m wondering what you (and the most likely beside himself tech ed coach) ultimately said to this mischievous student?!?!

      This made me think of when I was growing up, I remember when people told me that there would be people who would judge me based on the neatness of my haircut or the amount of activities I had participated in high school before they decided to let me into their university. I always thought at that point, in my teenage self obsessed frame of mind, “Well if those people can’t see the real me, then I don’t want to be part of their club.”

      I don’t teach teenagers, but I have great admiration for the patience and self control of those who do. I know we have to get our messages through to teenagers about the importance of this digital footprint, which will be analysed by those who teens may, while they are teenagers at least, see as possibly “uncool” adults…but how to do it?

      I imagine that Blaise420Pascal cared much more for the laughs of some of his/her buddies at the time than for the possible critique of future employers.

      How do your students take to these monthly digital citizenship themes? Do they buy into the need to be good digital citizens?

      I totally agree with you that if ALL teachers are pushing this idea that we have to be mindful of our cyber selves and the traces we leave behind on the internet, older students are much more likely to hear the message and relate to it.

      Great to hear your thoughts!

      -Jon

      • Hi Jon,

        Funnily enough it was the guilty look of the student that caused him to be caught – and he was the one who initiated the change of the name of his URL to blaisepascalfanboy. Yes I agree with you wholeheartedly – for him it was about the laughs he gets from his buddies and not digital footprints. I also agree with you that in some ways teenagers haven’t changed that much from when we were teenagers – they want to be accepted for the real people they are – not for some digital footprint. And in some ways that is still how I am too. When I think about my digital footprint and future job opportunities, for example, I, too, want to be judged for who I am and the work that I do with my students – not by my digital footprint. But I am also more and more aware that my digital footprint might play a role in future opportunities that I might pursue, so I am doing my best to get to it – hence my participation in COETAIL.

        To answer your question about our digital citizen themes in the high school, no I don’t think they have much impact on the students. I think the important part and the buy in from the students comes from what teachers model in the classroom and from the activities teachers ask the students to do. Hence the necessity for programs like COETAIL, i.e. to educate the teachers. As a high school math teacher, this program is definitely causing me to reflect on things I can and should be doing differently. Even though you are at the other end of the spectrum – it seems that the same can be said for you ☺

        Thanks again for your comments.

        Glenda

  • The unit I chose for my final project is “From A Different Angle.”  I created it for my grade 10 Extended Math class two years ago and I am teaching the unit for the second time this year. The unit has chan […]

  • I think it is fitting as I end Course 1 that I have been asked to reflect on globally collaborative projects in my curricular area. My first post of this COETAIL course was entitled My Shifting Landscapes, and […]

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    I had the pleasure of meeting Dan Meyer at a Math conference in Doha, Qatar about 5 years ago. While there I learned about his three act approach to teaching mathematics and his Tedtalk, Math Class N […]

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