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Jennifer Coleman

  • Jennifer Coleman posted a new activity comment 1 year, 1 month ago

    Thank you, Cary. I’m really benefitting from my connections with learning support teachers and other COETAILers around the world. It’s the best PD I have experienced. What an interesting PhD topic!

    Enjoy your summer!
    Jen

  • Jennifer Coleman posted a new activity comment 1 year, 1 month ago

    Thank you so much for watching my video and for your feedback, Steve! My students have really owned these projects. They’ve gotten some great feedback from peers at our school and the United Nations School in Hanoi (where I will be teaching next year!). They are sharing the projects with their different audiences this week and next. I can’t…[Read more]

  • Jennifer Coleman posted a new activity comment 1 year, 1 month ago

    Thank you so much, Jackie! I love bie.org but hadn’t seen this post until now. It’s very inspiring, and PBL makes so much sense if you want to create a more inclusive support model. The links to other special ed teachers’ PBL writings and the Universal Design for Learning info are also really helpful. Enjoy your summer!

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    I can’t believe I am writing the final post of my last COETAIL course. There were times I didn’t think I would reach this point, but here I am. I have to admit, I am happy to be done with this phase of […]

    • Hi Jen,

      I like your project a lot, including the benefits it must be giving the students. By sharing their own experiences of the learning challenges we all face, they are being both helpful to others and, no doubt, learning more by thinking through the advice they are giving.

      But it was also obvious that you focused on a number of areas including design, reflection and managing the time it takes to build a project. CoETaIL has been helpful in pushing me into areas, such as visual literacy, which I hadn’t thought enough about in the past. It is something which I find students pick up on, see the importance of and enjoy learning. They realise that they are already experts because of the amount of visual information they regularly consume.

      I also like the way you used and acknowledged the skills of your colleagues in adding dimensions to your project.

      Finally, the production values of your movie are excellent.

      I have six months to go on CoETaIL before I have to submit my own project and I’ve picked up some good ideas from you.

      Good luck with your new destination (you didn’t say where it is).

      Steve

      • Thank you so much for watching my video and for your feedback, Steve! My students have really owned these projects. They’ve gotten some great feedback from peers at our school and the United Nations School in Hanoi (where I will be teaching next year!). They are sharing the projects with their different audiences this week and next. I can’t envision my teaching future without PBL, especially after experiencing the level of engagement and quality of work my kids produced.

        I loved teaching the design elements through this project. I agree, my kids really enjoy learning about and applying visual literacy skills in their work. It’s so relevant.

        Best of luck to you as you approach your final six months of COETAIL. It was exhausting for me, but so worth it. It will be great to see your final project come to fruition.

        Have a wonderful summer.

        Jen

  • Ok. I am IN. I am getting it now. The magic of peer feedback, networking and connecting is motivating and it is happening. My Personal Learning Network is growing and manageable with tweet deck. I’m off to c […]

    • Jennifer I just helped a fellow teacher and PHD student with some of her research on my PLN (https://twitter.com/KayOddone or @KayOddone). One of the things that she asked me to do was map my PLN. The process of doing this had me looking critically at my PLN like you have done here and thinking about all of the awesome connections that I have made along the way, how those connections have directly or indirectly helped me and how I have been able to grow because of my PLN. I can’t imagine not having it.

      I hope that you continue to find the support that you need in your PLN!

      • Thank you, Cary. I’m really benefitting from my connections with learning support teachers and other COETAILers around the world. It’s the best PD I have experienced. What an interesting PhD topic!

        Enjoy your summer!
        Jen

  • Jennifer Coleman posted a new activity comment 1 year, 2 months ago

    Hi Jackie,

    It’s so nice to see another learning support teacher in the COETAIL community! Your post popped up just as I am working on my final project video and reflecting on my PLN/Community Engagement. A nice coincidence!

    I love your enthusiasm for flipped learning. I had similar questions and guidelines when I first started to visualize…[Read more]

  • Jennifer Coleman posted a new activity comment 1 year, 2 months ago

    Thank you, Cary. It has been amazing to see the kids reflect on their choice of tech for their final project presentations. I have to admit, I think I projected some of my own anxiety onto their learning process. It takes me so much longer to navigate new programs, but the kids transfer their knowledge to new programs quite fluidly. I’m finding…[Read more]

  • Jennifer Coleman posted a new activity comment 1 year, 2 months ago

    Thank you, Ben! Yes, I am so fortunate to have such a-MAZ-ing colleagues. Seeking help and letting myself be vulnerable as a teacher has only enhanced my (and my students’) learning. I agree; collaborating with others really helps me articulate my vision as well as incorporate new ideas into my work. I just need to make sure I keep my fear in…[Read more]

  • As my learning support students entered the final stages of their project – exploring a personal academic challenge in depth and presenting solutions to a chosen audience – we encountered a major hurdle. […]

    • Jennifer as a Tech Integrationist I have to remind teachers of what your coach said all of the time. I think I spend as much time helping teachers set realistic tech expectations for projects as I do teaching new skills.

      But I do hope that like your “three years of practice with various middle school research projects” has led you to trust in their research skills, doing similar things with tech lets kids build up skills that they can transfer quicker to new programs. I have seen it with kids in the past that they become so proficient with the tech tools that sharing their learning moves back to the forefront of projects, where it should be.

      Glad that you got good advice!

      • Thank you, Cary. It has been amazing to see the kids reflect on their choice of tech for their final project presentations. I have to admit, I think I projected some of my own anxiety onto their learning process. It takes me so much longer to navigate new programs, but the kids transfer their knowledge to new programs quite fluidly. I’m finding they are actually managing their time a bit better because they are motivated by their research and learning the new tech. It all seems to be coming together nicely, and I’ve learned so much through this process!

  • As I prepared to launch my COETAIL final project, I knew I was venturing into unchartered territory. I was excited about having my learning support students explore academic challenges in a PBL format and […]

    • What a great post Jennifer! I loved hearing how you sought out “helpers”. (I love that footage BTW.) I usually find reaching out to others always helps me consolidate my thinking as well as gather new ideas that almost always enhance whatever it is I’m working on.

      You are so lucky to have such wonderful people to work with!

      • Thank you, Ben! Yes, I am so fortunate to have such a-MAZ-ing colleagues. Seeking help and letting myself be vulnerable as a teacher has only enhanced my (and my students’) learning. I agree; collaborating with others really helps me articulate my vision as well as incorporate new ideas into my work. I just need to make sure I keep my fear in check and not let it sabotage the process!

  • Jennifer Coleman posted a new activity comment 1 year, 6 months ago

    Hi Chris,

    I enjoyed reading about your final project idea. I like that you have developed a course and will have a chance to try out some of your ideas in preparation for the fall. It sounds like you have a supportive administration, and the SAS and other PLN connections will certainly be a huge help. Thanks for introducing me to NPR’s “How I…[Read more]

  • Jennifer Coleman posted a new activity comment 1 year, 6 months ago

    Hi Kristen,

    I really enjoyed reading about your project idea! Your enthusiasm for teaching Shakespeare has really come through in this post, and I’m sure that will have a great buy-in effect with your students. I love the Edmondo project idea and having the kids get into character. Are you going to have them modernize the story elements or have…[Read more]

  • Jennifer Coleman posted a new activity comment 1 year, 6 months ago

    Hi Layla,

    Thank you for this post! Your question, “Having visited the elementary school in Tanzania, the question I keep pondering is: do innovative educational frameworks such as P21 in some ways create an even greater divide between those that have and those that have not?” has really left me thinking. Your description of Halima’s dream and…[Read more]

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    It’s hard to believe I am finally here. My COETAIL coursework is almost done and it’s time to construct and implement my final project. Due to a crazy past six weeks that included a Week Without Wall […]

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    As a teacher in a 1:1 learning environment for the past seven years, I am used to having/using devices in my classroom. Students use their laptops almost daily. If my students need anything – cameras, […]

  • As I reflected on the future of education for this post, my mind kept returning to a series of videos by Matthew Koehler and Punya Mishra called Thinking Creatively: Teachers as Designers of Content, […]

    • Hi Jen!

      So nice to connect with someone who is currently in a learning support position! I have really enjoyed exploring your different blog posts today! I agree with you that the teaching profession will not become obsolete, but I love your ideas about having your students create the videos that teachers can use as resources with their own class. This allows them to become experts on the topic, and also feel like their work is contributing towards the greater good.

      You mention Project Based Learning, with students who have diverse learning needs. I found this great blog written by an inclusion teacher in a high school setting:
      https://www.bie.org/blog/inclusive_special_education_via_pbl
      It has some great ideas – maybe it could be useful for you as well!!
      Hope your end of school year is going well!
      Jackie

      • Thank you so much, Jackie! I love bie.org but hadn’t seen this post until now. It’s very inspiring, and PBL makes so much sense if you want to create a more inclusive support model. The links to other special ed teachers’ PBL writings and the Universal Design for Learning info are also really helpful. Enjoy your summer!

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    Flipped Learning

    At the beginning of the 2012-2013 school year, our middle school math teachers piloted a new instructional model: flipped learning. The teachers assigned lessons for homework, which […]

    • Hi Jennifer
      I fully agree with you; although flipped classroom has its own benefits, but it heavily relies on student’s motivation. I have always used it to review a lesson since my students have different levels and I strongly believe that ‘one size fit all’ does not work in teaching. Edpuzzle(edpuzzle.com) is another app that let you add questions to YouTube, Ted-ED, Khan academy and other videos.
      I am a big fan of gaming in a classroom; it ensures 100% students engagement. I remember playing Bingo, memory cards, and jeopardy style review games, long time back, but thanks to internet games like Minecraft and scratch etc. that keep students engage. One of my students all time favourite is Khaoot (create.kahoot.it). Its an online app that allows, creating a quiz to reinforce the information that they have learnt.
      It is a competitive nature game that can be used as a formative assessment where all the data is collected in a spreadsheet.

    • Hello, Jennifer.

      You have prepared a very well organized and comprehensive overview of both game based learning and the flipped classroom. Your first picture is striking; it’s a fun play on flipped.

      As an English teacher, I can’t help but notice the amount of material available for Math teachers and flipping the classroom. As an English teacher, I can only imagine my frustration as a (not-particularly strong) math student while trying to navigate my way through the “instruction” at home. On the bright side, I suppose, my teacher would be able to provide more explanation in class than I was able to receive as a student in an algebra class *cough cough* years ago. I am glad to hear that the flipped classroom application in your school is growing and addressing multiple needs.

      When considering game play for my own post on this topic, I was disappointed to find that a very simple punctuation game I’ve had my students play is no longer functioning. I should try to find some new material, especially now that I am teaching MS again. I find it to be particularly effective with that audience.

      Thanks for the post.

      Best,

      Kristen

    • Thanks for the shout-out Jen!

      I was a self-directed learner and a gamer before I became a teacher, so it seems natural to me to try and take the things I like to learn from and offer kids an even better, curated and guided experience.
      I’m working on fun videos for kids to flip my tech skills for my final project, and I’m always happy to share my experiences with Minecraft and other games in my classroom. Feel free to give me a holler anytime if you think I can help!

  • I enjoyed delving into the topics of project-, problem-, and challenged-based learning, although it was initially a struggle to differentiate between the three. After exploring the readings and coming across […]

    • Thanks for sharing the CBL Framework Resource. It really does look like it strongly supports and complements the PYP (I’m less familiar with the MYP-but assume there are strong similarities) approach.
      I’m also reminded of Apple’s increased efforts at Educational Support (beyond apps/Apple Classroom.)
      You prompted me to revisit the Education section of their website http://www.apple.com/education/teachers/
      and to continue to check back for new resources.
      Good luck in your new role next year–the “Learning Strategies” course sounds very interesting–I think everyone would benefit from such a course!
      Cheers,
      Holly

    • Hi Jennifer,

      Thanks for sharing this blogpost about PBL/CBL and all other BLs. I was grateful for the link to the Challenge Based Learning PDF from Apple. At the moment I am in the process of designing a PBL elective course to run in August 2017 for the first time and I’ve been struggling with some of the sub-structures that I need in place. The PDF you shared (along with the diagram/framework) seems like a good starting place. I’ve already explored how to take a big idea and develop a driving question, and also practiced with some of my current students the technique of developing student-driven “need to knows” based on the driving question, but once students have those “need to knows”, I need to up my game and provide structures and protocols to help students successfully tackle those “need to knows” without too many gaps in what they discover. I’m still a big fan of handwritten notes, and I believe the research agrees that hand written notes still do provide a benefit in terms of consolidation of ideas within the brain (I could be wrong on this, but I think so). Anyway, what I’m hoping to do is create a bunch of different note taking templates that students could choose from to guide their notes as they investigate their “need to knows”. On each note-taking template there would be a section for students to write the “need to know” clearly at the top, but then it might break down somewhat like a PowerPoint slide (I’m thinking A5 size) with the lefthand side of the note-taking template being for a graphic, smart art, drawing, quote, big number, etc… The righthand side would be lined for students to write their ideas in sentence or bullet point form. My thought is that if I create enough of these A5 note-taking templates (I’m thinking dozens of different types), then hopefully students will have a template that helps them no matter what type of “need to know” they are investigating at that moment. If it’s an interview with the local mayor, they might need to choose a template that allows them to record the best quotes. If they are investigating a process, such as the water cycle, perhaps there would be a note-taking template that has smart art on the lefthand side which looks like a circular process, that type of thing. Anyway, just some ideas and thanks again for your blog post.

      Chris

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    As I prepared for a job search this fall, I started with the typical steps familiar to most international educators. I updated my resume, revised my educational philosophy statement, and activated my […]

  • Jennifer Coleman posted a new activity comment 1 year, 7 months ago

    Hi all! So sorry for being an absent cohort member. I am just coming up for air after a Week Without Walls trip, starting up our soccer season, and an intense job search that took us to the GRC fair in Dubai…all during the first three weeks of Course 4. The good news…our family will be moving to Hanoi next summer to start our new…[Read more]

    • Wow! These all sound incredible! And… congratulations on your new gig! I’m sure you will love Hanoi! Vietnam is a wonderful country.

      I’m interested to see which of these projects your students are most interested in tackling. They all seem very engaging!

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