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Morgan Purdy

  • Morgan Purdy posted a new activity comment 2 years, 10 months ago

    They will love it! Happy to help with the trouble-shooting in advance 🙂

  • flickr photo shared by Yogendra174 under a Creative Commons ( BY ) license
    As much as the it was difficult for me to start the Coetail process for Course 5, once I got into it, it was so much fun!  I […]

    • So glad you stuck with it! And congrats!

    • Hi Morgan,
      What a great idea! Honestly, I can’t wait to try this out in my classroom. We’re currently in the middle of the Kindergarten Super Readers unit and it’s just so fitting for where we are right now. The students are familiar with Seesaw, and with a little planning, they will LOVE teaching their peers and family about their ‘super powers’!
      Thank you for the step-by-step. Your video was so clear and I feel like it troubleshooted potential obstacles I would run into. In the past, we’ve also had students explain a reading strategy.. at the same time, I also feel like your project is a little different because students aren’t just showing, but they are teaching a strategy – and that, makes it even more meaningful. Thank you!
      Good luck with everything,
      Nicky

  • flickr photo shared by Robert Q Benedict under a Creative Commons ( BY )
    I have been very open in my previous posts about my struggles with settling into my new role as a mother of two, my new role in my new […]

  • Morgan Purdy posted a new activity comment 2 years, 11 months ago

    I’m so glad you found it helpful! One thing I have been working on over the past couple years is being vocal about what I’m finding difficult in whatever journey I am on. Usually, I find many along the same path as me 🙂

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  • flickr photo shared by brianna.lehman under a Creative Commons ( BY ) license
    The start of a new school year.  New clothes, new books, new faces, the promise of starting over, making changes, doing all of […]

    • Reading your post is like reading someone read my mind. I don’t have the baby and toddler, but I have a 9 year old who is missing her friends and school. I also considered dropping out and wondered how I could ever have thought this is a good idea. Your more recent post is so inspiring. I am still not there yet but do see the light at the end of the tunnel. Thank you for your honesty and for making me feel less alone. Strength!

      • I’m so glad you found it helpful! One thing I have been working on over the past couple years is being vocal about what I’m finding difficult in whatever journey I am on. Usually, I find many along the same path as me 🙂

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    As I think back over all I’ve learned this year during my Coetail journey, I freely admit that I found Course 4 to be the most […]

  • Morgan Purdy posted a new activity comment 3 years, 5 months ago

    Your title really caught my eye – I wasn’t sure what “spoofing” was, so I checked out your blog to learn more.

    As a parent of two, Internet safety and responsible use are lessons I think about how I will introduce to my children on a regular basis (I still have a couple years to go, so I’m hoping my coetail experience will properly equip me…[Read more]

  • flickr photo shared by Kathy Blades under a Creative Commons ( BY-NC-SA ) license
    Over the past few courses, I think I’ve been pretty open about my lack of skill with technology, as well as some of my […]

  • flickr photo shared by Ken Whytock under a Creative Commons ( BY-NC ) license /small
    The million dollar question that I continue to come up against as a teacher, and a parent: “How can you prepare students for […]

  • Morgan Purdy posted a new activity comment 3 years, 6 months ago

    Hi Paul,

    I think having the students give their teachers feedback is an interesting idea. We provide our students with plenty of feedback to help them grow as learners. It makes a lot of sense that we would have the people we have the most contact with, that interact directly with our practices, give us their perspective. I totally…[Read more]

  • Morgan Purdy posted a new activity comment 3 years, 6 months ago

    Hi Jessica,

    Thanks for posting on this topic. I also work at a school that has limited access to technology. I have spent a lot of time trying to figure out how to take the resources available and try to incorporate that into providing students at our school with different opportunities. I liked your tip to have teachers spend a half and…[Read more]

  • Morgan Purdy posted a new activity comment 3 years, 6 months ago

    Hi Kate,

    I loved your idea of online portfolios to accompany student led conferences. My school has been using student led conferences as our second official conference of the school year for the past 7 years, and I believe that this is such a meaningful opportunity for students to show off their learning and for parents to sit and hear about…[Read more]

    • Thanks for your feedback Morgan! This is the fourth year I have done online portfolios and it really is great. The main thing is to have a good structure in place. The first year we just “experimented” with whatever online platform we wanted and it was kind of a disaster. No one knew what was required or what to do. Also, it is harder for teachers…[Read more]

  • Morgan Purdy posted a new activity comment 3 years, 6 months ago

    Hi Danieal,

    Glad that picture caught your eye (and that I had chosen wisely). I also appreciate you providing me with the translation – I like it even more now that I fully understand the message! 🙂

    Those are some great tips as to how to integrate technology into the literacy side of things. I had been thinking that grammar would be a great…[Read more]

  • flickr photo shared by educ@conTIC under a Creative Commons ( BY-SA ) license
    Before I get into this post, I should probably admit that I have no idea what the speech bubbles in the above picture say.  I […]

    • I just had a friend read the speech bubbles, and she has indicated that you’ve selected well! I though it was funny when I saw it, which is why I opened your post! You caught my eye.

      In the photo, the first student (moving from left to right) is saying that he (the teacher) can’t stop innovating, the second student basically says, “You think?!” and the final student is sharing how she thinks their professor is taking this whole”flipping thing” very seriously.

      That is a very enthusiastic teacher! If only we could all have as much excitement towards trying new things and taking risks, we’d all be doing “flips” in the classroom.

      A few years ago, I worked with a teacher who I felt had mastered the idea of a flipped literacy classroom. He was constantly creating, sharing, and posting resources, videos, mini lessons, review sessions, and tutorials for his students to access in the classroom and at home.

      Using a classroom blog as his platform he added a weekly vocabulary video or slide show, where he introduced the word, it’s definition, and examples of how it could be used.

      Students then accessed various common spaces, such as a google document or Padlet, https://padlet.com/, and created their own sentence or statement showing their understanding of the vocabulary word.

      Additionally, he provided extra mini grammar or concept lessons for his students to watch independently to reinforce what they had learned or to help those that were still struggling after an in class lesson. Many students were then able to apply the skills to their learning.

      I took a stab at sharing our stories vocabulary this way…it was a challenge as this was my first attempt at blogging, grade2qaw.blogspot.com. It didn’t last long, as I became overwhelmed with other demands at school, but my students loved it and were accessing the slides from home when they needed help to complete their vocabulary homework.

      As I write this post, I think about week one of course 4, Technology Integration, and how student created products, videos, and books could be added to a common area to help reinforce concepts or topics that other students may have missed or are learning. I could add mini lessons about various apps and technology tools that students could use. Those who were interested to access the videos or links and explore a different area of technology, taking the level of creating to sharing to a level of peer teaching and collaborating!

      • Hi Danieal,

        Glad that picture caught your eye (and that I had chosen wisely). I also appreciate you providing me with the translation – I like it even more now that I fully understand the message! 🙂

        Those are some great tips as to how to integrate technology into the literacy side of things. I had been thinking that grammar would be a great place to start, but wasn’t exactly sure what the next steps will be. I will definitely be using your comment to help me as I attempt to structure some proposals for teachers. Thank you for sharing your knowledge and experiences!

  • Morgan Purdy posted a new activity comment 3 years, 6 months ago

    Hi Chris,

    I think you made an excellent point about our ability to “instantly fact check anything we hear”. I’ve definitely relied on the use of my iPhone during many conversations with friends and colleagues in situations where we didn’t know the answer to something, or we disagreed on a certain point. As someone who has little experience…[Read more]

  • flickr photo shared by dkuropatwa under a Creative Commons ( BY-NC-SA ) license
    As educators, one of our ultimate goals is to help students deepen their understanding of concepts we are teaching.  We want […]

  • Morgan Purdy posted a new activity comment 3 years, 6 months ago

    Hi Chris,

    I really liked the comparison you made between Bloom’s Taxonomy and the SAMR model. Despite all the reading I had done on SAMR and TPACK, because it is a new of critiquing and organizing information for me, I found myself constantly going back and referencing the images both models use to help readers understand them in a more…[Read more]

  • flickr photo shared by AV Hire London under a Creative Commons ( BY ) license
    I’ve referenced this point several times over the past three courses:  my school is behind the times when it comes to integrating […]

    • Hi Morgan,

      I am very glad to be able to read your post on our first assignment of Course 4. It seems like a daunting task that I have yet to start, at least in the writing phase. To bundle up our thoughts in a nice neat package on the philosophy of technology integration isn’t easy. Most of my time so far has been spent locating and reading information about the SAMR and TPACK models.

      The first point I would like to bring up that you wrote about is your reflection that the SAMR model, “assumes that teachers have a certain level of comfort with technology.” I am really glad that you made this observation, and I could not agree more. While I find that the SAMR model makes assessing our technology integration on a task-by-task basis easier, it doesn’t address our ability to coordinate or align our understanding of pedagogical, content, and technology best practices in a broader sense. The Venn diagram approach makes for an excellent visual model.

      There appears to be a lot of similarities between the SAMR model in terms of purpose with Bloom’s Taxonomy. You mentioned that, “When I reflect on how I use technology for teaching and learning using the SAMR model, I feel like I am pretty stuck on the substitution level.” While important learning gains may come from modification and redefinition under the SAMR model, I don’t feel that substitution and augmentation are no less important and relevant. Moving to the the other two areas does, however, require greater access to technology resources for teachers and more importantly students. Creating learning experiences that modify and redefine do, in my opinion, require a shift from a teacher-centric to a student-centric learning culture. A lot of institutions, mine included, are still in that same place even in 1-to-1 technology environments. At the end of the day, it’s not the tools so much as the understanding of their efficient and effective use that does matter the most.

      Again, thank you for your thought-provoking post. It helped tie some of the reading and research that I have done lately with a more practical application and understanding of the SAMR and TPACK models in my own practice and school environment.

      Best wishes,

      Chris

      • Hi Chris,

        I really liked the comparison you made between Bloom’s Taxonomy and the SAMR model. Despite all the reading I had done on SAMR and TPACK, because it is a new of critiquing and organizing information for me, I found myself constantly going back and referencing the images both models use to help readers understand them in a more concrete way. Thinking about it terms of the similarities to Bloom’s Taxonomy helped me to make more connections and organize that information in my head. Thanks!

    • Morgan, I loved reading this post. I’m at at the point of trying-to-catch up after weeks if not months being behind. This morning I took on to all the reading for this unit and dutifully wrote my post and never thought about or reflected on what the reading meant for someone in a place and space that doesn’t have access to all the new tech gadgets. I’m fortunate to work in a school in which every classroom is equipped with SmartBoards, AppleTV, 1:1 laptops and/or iPads, document cameras… the list can continue. Even with all the gadgets, the practices of our school sound quite similar to your situation. This made me wonder, is it access or interest or support… or all of the above? You ended your post with remarking on how much technology has changed since you were a student. I recall that in the beginning of one of this week’s reads a quote regarding the notion that we must all embrace change because change was inevitable and occurring at neck-breaking speeds is necessary. I guess I always thought that there were only two camps: those who were really far away and those who were close. Those who were really far away have been teaching for decades; those who were close teaching in years, not decades. I don’t know where you fall. It really doesn’t matter. With what our students need to learn and what this means for how we teach, decades are no longer the defining line or ins-and-outs; the defining line is by degrees. Degree to which we reflect and act on what is current and relevant. Doesn’t matter if we’ve been teaching for forty years…twenty years…three years. Change happened. Change happens. We can either get with the times… or not. Working in a school in which the resources, environment, and culture encourages a relevant response would be nice. You’re doing great things: post-it notes or tech. Thanks again, Emily

  • http://flickr.com photo shared by Yogendra174 under a Creative Commons ( BY ) license
    As I’ve talked about in a previous post, learning about the Presentation Zen theory was a real game changer for me.  As […]

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